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Hi Everyone,

Been a lurker here for a bit, but had a quick question that I didn't really see answered elsewhere on this site. I am planning on switching from my winters on my 2019 N-Line soon and wanted some input on how others got it done (also for future maintenance and work on the vehicle). I do know about the jack points by each wheel per the owner's manual, however if I use those then I don't believe I'd be able to place the jack stands there. This is my first car so I'm kind of new to this. I've seen others use the sub frame on other vehicles, however haven't seen anything for this vehicle. I assume it would be pretty similar, however wanted to check how others did it (even better if you could point me to the specific lift points used), or if there are other things to look out for before I went poking around under there.

Thanks in advance for your help!
 

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I doubt that this is a good idea

I had the same same question on my wife's 2018 mustang. It turns out that in order to jack one side up, you need to install an aftermarket tubular bar running from front to rear jacking points on each side. I would think the same would apply here. I doubt that such a bar is available, as very few of us are autocrossing or racing this thing (and that's a shame).



If you opt for a 22mm rear sway bar, jacking up the front wheel will also raise the rear wheel off of the ground, which is handy for the seasonal tire changing. This doesn't affect ride quality much for front seat occupants, but I recently discovered that it is noticeable for rear seat passengers. It's a must-have for autocrossing, as it keeps the inside front tire planted when accelerating out of tight turns.
 

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Interesting I will have to look at the manual. My first thought based on all the cars I have and had to work on, there should be an area on the sub-frame. In front I would think were the engine cradle mounts to the sub-frame, seems like that would work. Again I have not looked under the car yet. I think Discount Tire does that for little on no cost. I did by my winter tires from them so that may be the reason why they do that. Are you in the US? I am in Michigan and have not seen another N Line.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had the same same question on my wife's 2018 mustang. It turns out that in order to jack one side up, you need to install an aftermarket tubular bar running from front to rear jacking points on each side. I would think the same would apply here. I doubt that such a bar is available, as very few of us are autocrossing or racing this thing (and that's a shame).



If you opt for a 22mm rear sway bar, jacking up the front wheel will also raise the rear wheel off of the ground, which is handy for the seasonal tire changing. This doesn't affect ride quality much for front seat occupants, but I recently discovered that it is noticeable for rear seat passengers. It's a must-have for autocrossing, as it keeps the inside front tire planted when accelerating out of tight turns.

Thanks for the input! Have you done some autocrossing in this? I was thinking of giving it a try but haven't had the time to do my research.
 

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Interesting I will have to look at the manual. My first thought based on all the cars I have and had to work on, there should be an area on the sub-frame. In front I would think were the engine cradle mounts to the sub-frame, seems like that would work. Again I have not looked under the car yet. I think Discount Tire does that for little on no cost. I did by my winter tires from them so that may be the reason why they do that. Are you in the US? I am in Michigan and have not seen another N Line.
Thanks! I didn't really see anything in the manual other than the side jack points, but I think that the area you mentioned should work. I didn't end up using the jack stands this time around in the interest of time and just jacked it at the side points, but I will try it out when the oil change time comes around.

I'm actually in Toronto, Canada! I have seen a few N Lines in my city, but they are a rare breed sadly :(
 

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I wouldn't bother using jackstands just to swap wheels. Jack the corner and change the wheel. Obviously don't get under the car. You could also slide a wheel under the car as extra insurance should the jack fail.



I did a tire rotation recently...front to back. I jacked from the front side jacking point and was able to get both wheels off the ground. I don't have any aftermarket parts. I hope there's a center jacking point but front and rear but I haven't looked yet. Even if you do have one most jacks won't be able to reach them unless you first drive up on ramps or jack up each side and set the wheels on something elevated (solid stacks of wood, for example).


To do an oil change I jacked from the front right location. I placed other items under the car to be sure I couldn't be injured. After removing the drain plug I lowered the car to be sure all oil drained.



Unfortunately the owner's manual does not specify any lifting locations other than the typical four locations.
 

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Re: Autocrossing the GT Sport

The GT Sport is a capable autocrosser and competes primarily with Civic Si's and Fiesta ST's in my neck of the woods (North Carolina). The base class is H Street.


Keys to being competitive are 201 hp, independent rear suspension, and the sweet seven-speed dual clutch transmission (six-speed stick should work just about as well). For local competitions the only upgrades needed are tires and a stiffer rear sway bar. Factory shocks are really pretty good.


I'm running the same relative class-adjusted (PAX) position as I did in a BRZ for four years, which is right in the middle (actually 62 of 124 in last year's final event).


Be aware that H Street attracts a lot of good national-level drivers, as it costs less to prep your car to the max in H Street than in a higher class. Don't feel bummed out for not being in the top of the class, just enjoy the thrill.


Event schedules and club info are at motorsportsreg.com.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I wouldn't bother using jackstands just to swap wheels. Jack the corner and change the wheel. Obviously don't get under the car. You could also slide a wheel under the car as extra insurance should the jack fail.



I did a tire rotation recently...front to back. I jacked from the front side jacking point and was able to get both wheels off the ground. I don't have any aftermarket parts. I hope there's a center jacking point but front and rear but I haven't looked yet. Even if you do have one most jacks won't be able to reach them unless you first drive up on ramps or jack up each side and set the wheels on something elevated (solid stacks of wood, for example).


To do an oil change I jacked from the front right location. I placed other items under the car to be sure I couldn't be injured. After removing the drain plug I lowered the car to be sure all oil drained.



Unfortunately the owner's manual does not specify any lifting locations other than the typical four locations.
Yeah this is pretty much what I ended up doing to change the tires. From what I've been told you can use the front subframe immediately behind the rear engine mount attachment point and the rear subframe crossmember. I didn't really have a chance to confirm as it started raining when I was changing my tires so I didn't look under before lowering the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The GT Sport is a capable autocrosser and competes primarily with Civic Si's and Fiesta ST's in my neck of the woods (North Carolina). The base class is H Street.


Keys to being competitive are 201 hp, independent rear suspension, and the sweet seven-speed dual clutch transmission (six-speed stick should work just about as well). For local competitions the only upgrades needed are tires and a stiffer rear sway bar. Factory shocks are really pretty good.


I'm running the same relative class-adjusted (PAX) position as I did in a BRZ for four years, which is right in the middle (actually 62 of 124 in last year's final event).


Be aware that H Street attracts a lot of good national-level drivers, as it costs less to prep your car to the max in H Street than in a higher class. Don't feel bummed out for not being in the top of the class, just enjoy the thrill.


Event schedules and club info are at motorsportsreg.com.
Thanks for the info! I'm in Canada so I don't think I'm able to use that site, however I did find some more information for events/clubs in my city. Once the COVID situation blows over, I'll definitely look into going and hopefully participating.
 

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I use rubber jack pad adapter with a slit in it on my hydraulic floor jack saddle, that way I can put it on that sill under the car. I leave enough room to place a jackstand where the factory jack points are and put the hydraulic jack right behind (usually it lifts just that corner). Place the jackstand in that spot (which also has a rubber adapter for the cradle that accommodates the sill) and very slowly lower the car onto the stand.

The adapters for both the jackpad saddle and the jackstands have slits in them that allow the car's sill to 1) sit flat 2) gives me piece of mind that the weight of the car isn't sitting on that narrow edge of metal (even though people claim it's safe). I've left the car overnight on the jackstand and adapters and do my seasonal wheel swaps this way too.

Jack pad adapter: https://amzn.to/2X6Wys8 This guy has lasted 2 years but showing some wear so I'll probably replace next year.
Jackstand adapter (pair): https://amzn.to/3elwKy8 Just make sure your jackstand cradle looks like similar shape as the pics
 
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