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Discussion Starter #1
To all the 2018 GT Sport owners, is it just me or are the back wheels stanced a little bit?

I'll have to take a picture tomorrow when it's light but basically if you look at the car from the front the front wheels are straight up and down. When you look at them from the back, the bottom of the back wheels seem to stick out a little further than the tops.

No one at the dealerships service departments really had any useful ideas besides "bring it in" or "get your wheel aligned" Right, on a 1300 mile car...

I've heard of people doing this to cars (mostly for looks) but I wasn't sure if this was because of the:

1. Multi-link rear suspension
2. Manufacturing issue
3. On purpose?
4. Something else

Any thoughts?
 

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I think stanced cars, especially the extreme ones are just for looks and is horrible for your car. NO idea why a manufacturer would do it from factory.
 

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I sort of see what you're suggesting but I'm just going to assume the tires don't sit quite as flush with the wheel well as the average car does. Either way I'd have to agree with the comment above that stanced cars are not a good idea for everyday drivers. You know you could get some wider tires to really emphasize the look.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hmm yeah, maybe the bumper has a slight curve-in that I can't perceive.

And yes, I think stancing doesn't make sense in most cases. Really just causes issues for what most do with it.

I'll look into tires when these wear out. Until then, if I actually see another 2018 Elantra GT on the road I'll look at their wheels!
 

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For a more "sporty" setup, you want some static negative camber. This give you more grip when cornering at higher speeds, because your wheel/tire will roll over to neutral camber giving you a better contact patch with the road. You are probably looking at most -1.5 degrees from the factory here. Don't worry, the engineers know what they are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ahh, and that would explain why my old 4x4 SUV wheels were straight up and down. No fast corners there.

I trust the engineers know what they are doing, thanks for the explanation I've never heard of that before!
 

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I see what your talking about, but to me it looks like it may just be the way the rear body/bumper is curving that may be messing with our perception .
 

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You could always just take it in for an alignment check if your really concerned. Not the first time I got a car with a bad stance brand new. My Honda Civic had major alignment issues when I first bought it so did my 2013 audi but the Audi was bought used.
 

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Because the rear suspension on these is independent, there could be a slight amount of negative camber set from the factory.
 

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MOST cars will have a bit of negative camber from the factory. Companies are doing it for the handling aspect. My focus had almost 2 degrees from the factory. Look at the ass end of a BMW X5 from a few years ago. They’re running insane looking camber in the rear.

Your car is fine.

PS
“Stancing” is a Bullshit exaggeration of racing alignments it’s not an actual term nor does it provide ANY benefit.
 

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I noticed the same thing on my 2019 Elantra GT Nline. The factory spec I saw for the front was +/- 0.5 deg camber. The rear looks like about 1 deg negative (top of tire leaning toward centerline of car). I did two track days and noticed a lot of understeer. I had adjustable strut bolts installed at the front and got 1.3 deg negative camber. Fast corners on the street feel much better. Will do another track day as soon as the virus blows over. Adding another adjustable bolt to the front struts will give more neg camber. There are adjustable rear suspension links that allow camber adjustments there.

Tires generate "camber thrust" in the direction of the camber lean. This is extra lateral force in addition to that generated by slip angle. As described in another post negative camber also improves the shape of the contact patch for the tire on the outside of a turn.
 

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looks EXACTLY like mine

I had a 4-wheel alignment done (2016 GT) and the result was the same as yours. I haven't put many miles on it since, so don't know if there will be any effect on tread wear...yet. I'll know soon. I have been keeping a close eye on them and don't see anything so far.
 
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